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About Us

Our Mission

 DRI Kenya's Mission is to provide internationally recognized education  and certification to business continuity, disaster recovery and emergency management  professionals and organizations in  East Africa (Kenya Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda and Burundi) and empowers them with knowledge and skills to be creative, resilient and better prepared business resilient entities against any emergency or disaster.

ABOUT DRI KENYA

For so long, Africa has been missed out on some of the future-ready education and training needed for the next generation professionals needed to manage resilience in governments - county and national- and multi-national businesses systems  in the  East and Central African region. Business Resilience and Disaster Recovery Management professionals are trained and accredited by Disaster Recovery Institute International (DRII) are some of the most sought-after professionals, yet Africans - some of the most educated folks in the world - are least represented in this field of resilience profession. DRI Kenya is responding by bringing face-to-face training and accreditation to both individuals and organizations across east and Central Africa. Our training targets practicing Disaster management and IT professionals, Health sector - Hospitals and Doctors' communities , Churches Disaster Management Units,  professionals  in architecture and engineering, International Red Cross and UN agencies' officials in this region. DRI Kenya in partnership with Solidrock Cybersolutions  Ltd performs BCM audits  and  gap assessments  on the existing   Disaster and Emergency Response Systems and programs and helps the organizations  develop a Business Continuity and Disaster Management Program to close theses gaps.


DRI International has more than 15,000 certified individuals in over 100 countries, and 93 percent of all Fortune 100 companies employ DRI certified professionals and very few of our African professionals make up  this privileged group of 15,000 professionals. SOLIDROCK CYBERSOLUTIONS have partnered with DRI International (DRI Kenya) to bring this well-needed Business Resilience and Disaster Recovery Management Education and World-class Training  to Kenyans, Ugandans, Tanzanians, Rwandese, Burundians, Ugandans, and Central Africans professionals and military officials. 


DRI Kenya Training and Certification are designed to meet the needs of  East African and regional headquartered multinational organizations such as the UN agencies, public and private sectors , and professional bodies  in a variety of roles,  including Engineers, medical Doctors, Teachers, IT Experts, in these areas:-

  • Business Continuity Management
  • Risk Management
  • Disaster Response
  • Crisis Management
  • Resilience
  • And More!

In addition to certifying individuals, DRI Kenya assesses organizations to determine resilience and offers organizational accreditation. DRI Kenya also serves continuity professionals through conferencing, outreach, and volunteerism. The annual DRI Kenya Conference, set to take pace in December, 2018 will  bring resilience professionals together to network with experts and collaborate with their peers. In Partnership with DRI International, DRI Kenya's mission is to promote disaster risk reduction through education, accreditation and certification, as well as aid recovery efforts through fundraising and volunteerism. 


As a recognized expert resource, DRI Kenya acts in an advisory capacity to organizations and government institutions in East Africa, helping to develop professional standards and promote greater resilience. DRI is a member of the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction's (UNISDR) Private Sector Working Group ARISE Initiative. DRI is also an ANSI-accredited Standards Development Organization, a CQI and IRCA Approved Training Partner, and an International Organization Liaison Observer to ISO/TC 292 for standardization in the field of security to enhance the safety and resilience of society. 

Code of Ethics for Certified Professionals Code of Ethics

 DRI International requires its certified professionals to adhere to a strict code of ethics, and recertification demands a continuing commitment. Certified business continuity professionals will:

  • Practice the highest level of professionalism at all times in the performance of our duties
  • Practice conduct that is legal and ethical and will avoid any perception of conflict of interest for ourselves, our employers, and our clients
  • Practice and promote corporate continuity and disaster recovery concepts
  • Keep confidential any information revealed as such in the performance of our duties
  • Continually seek to increase our competence and the competence of those who work with us
  • Participate in continuing professional knowledge and skill improvement programs

WHAT IS BCM

WHAT IS BCM?


Business Continuity Management is defined as a:
Holistic management process that identifies potential threats to an organization and the impacts to business operations those threats, if realized, might cause, and which provides a framework for building organizational resilience with the capability of an effective response that safeguards the interests of its key stakeholders, reputation, brand and value-creating activities.


Business Continuity Management (BCM) integrates the disciplines of Emergency Response, Crisis Management, Disaster Recovery (technology continuity) and Business Continuity (organizational/operational relocation).

Throughout the profession, definitions of Business Continuity Management abound. However, research conducted by the DRI International Glossary Committee identifies the most accurate description of Business Continuity Management as the definition from the ISO 22301 standard cited above. As part of an ongoing process to create and maintain an international glossary, the committee determined the best-in-class definitions for commonly used BCP/DR terms. Creation of the glossary document involved an independent body of highly respected volunteers examining existing recognized definitions and reaching a consensus on which source(s) reflected the most accurate meaning.

The Value of Business Continuity Management

The reasons to have a robust Business Continuity Management program are many and the scope of such a program is enterprise-wide. Here is a list of some of the top reasons that make Business Continuity Management a priority:

Legal and Regulatory Compliance

Regulation: There are over 120 regulations that mandate Business Continuity Management across a variety of industries, including but not limited to:

  • Financial Services - Federal Financial Institution's Examination Council (FFIEC), Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), Financial Services Authority (FSA), among others
  • Energy - North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC)
  • Healthcare - Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) and Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO)
  • International - The International Regulatory Framework for Banks (BASEL III) and all Central Banks have Business Continuity Management requirements

Negligence: Court decisions, the basis for common law, have ruled that "failure to prepare" as well as "failure to plan" are grounds for negligence. Negligence is defined as a part of tort or personal injury as "a failure to use that degree of care that any prudent person would use under the same or similar circumstances."

Demands by Organizations for their Vendors

Customer demand: Requests for Proposal (RFPs) now require potential vendors to demonstrate that they have Business Continuity Management programs in place.

Regulation: There are regulatory requirements that govern preparedness in the supply chain. Specifically, federally chartered banks are governed by the FFIEC and the OCC (Office of the Controller of the Currency), which charters, regulates, and supervises all national banks and federal savings associations as well as federal branches and agencies of foreign banks. For healthcare organizations, the primary regulatory consideration in the supply chain is covered under HIPAA. All of these regulations call for ongoing monitoring of the third party's activities and performance.

Smart business: It is a competitive advantage for companies to have a resilient supply chain that will make them better able to respond to a disruption than their competition. This ability will make the prepared company a more attractive supplier to larger organizations that will benefit from the increased reliability of the smaller business.

To Maximize Insurance Coverage

Business Continuity Management increases an organization's ability to provide risk transfer information, including in the:

  • Analysis Phase of Business Continuity Management: Organizations conducting a Business Impact Analysis (BIA) will be able to ascertain the profit losses as well as the amount of fixed costs that must be paid in the event of an incident that triggers an insured peril. This calculation will help quantify the proper amount of Business Interruption Insurance (BI). The BIA similarly helps to calculate Contingent Business Interruption Insurance (CBI) and Supply Chain Insurance reimburses lost profits resulting from an interruption of business at the premises of a customer or supplier.
  • Strategy Phase of Business Continuity Management: Extra Expense Insurance provides for maintaining the operations of an insured item after an accident until normal operations can be restored.

Reputation and Resilience Management

Business Continuity Management can help organizations protect their reputation and increase their resilience in the face of adverse circumstances, whether internal or external. Business Continuity Management can help to protect the brand from a variety of risks, including cyber risks, deliver to customers as promised, and reduce downtime and the cost of recovery in the event of an incident.

SUPPLY CHAIN IMPACT

 

Critical Supply Chain Impact

The recent plethora of natural disasters will impact many supply chains. We have seen breakdowns in critical transport infrastructure (roads, railways, and ports), as well as other key infrastructure disruptions (access to power and the internet). Nimble organizations with solid business continuity programs already had tested plans in place that may have included diversifying supply chains, rerouting shipments, and stockpiling key inputs. While some organizations were able to plan and react their way out of the worst, we will see an economic impact for years to come as a result of revised sales forecasts, reduced domestic oil production, disrupted air travel, and more.

Since Houston is a hub and the nation’s fourth largest city, disruption there will have a particularly significant effect on the U.S. economy, particularly in terms of supply chain, sales forecasts, reduced refinery output, and port disruption. Houston’s economy is built on the oil and gas industry, but has diversified to include important investments in other areas such as aerospace, healthcare, and biomedical research. The port is an essential entry point for Latin American and Caribbean food imports. One of the most far-reaching supply chain issues will be the Houston-made plastics and chemicals that serve as inputs for many products. Houston has become a major corporate center and the cost of Harvey alone could reach the high billions when considering the impact on transportation, the power grid, the work force, and the rest of the network of economic activity that supports leading local sectors.

From a human standpoint, there is a disaster in Houston. From a business standpoint, there is a disaster beyond Houston. That’s why it’s important for all organizations to understand that their supply chains can be disrupted even if there was no immediate damage to their facilities, people, or internal processes. Organizations can use the business continuity framework to anticipate challenges and build structured response plans to protect core competencies against the potentially devastating effects of prolonged shortages. Resilience is not just important for customer-facing brands: a problem that stems from an upstream supplier, which may be a much smaller company with fewer resources to cope under duress, can damage any brand. It is a competitive advantage for companies to have a resilient supply chain that will make them better able to respond to a disruption than their competition.

HITTING HOME

 

Hitting Home

Businesses also must consider the impact of disasters on their personnel and the community. People are the most important resource of any organization. With the ever-present pressure for efficiency, many business continuity, risk management, and supply chain management programs have been merged, restructured, or scaled back. That leaves fewer hands on deck when it comes to dealing with a disaster. In the case of the recent hurricanes, just as one was wrapping up, another was on the way, and then another, and another. That causes considerable personnel strain, especially when resilience professionals are in response mode working long days and their programs have been cut more than is prudent. Additional resources must to be allocated to these departments in order to ensure that they will be effective.

It is also important for organizations to recognize that all of their personnel may be under additional stress, whether at home or in the office, as the result of community-wide disruptions. Management should take an empathetic approach during the initial phase of the recovery. It will be essential to understand the human aspects of the disaster first. Leaders may need to adjust their usual management style to better support their team during the recovery phase. Employees might be physically back in the office but mentally still coping with the disaster and its effects. In a difficult situation, flexibility is essential to help the team feel comfortable and safe as they return to the workplace. Employees may need flexible hours or the ability to work from home until their usual routines are restored, so rigid policies may need to be relaxed for a time as the community returns to normal.

Increasingly, large organizations are expected not only to take care of themselves, but also to reach out and offer help to their customers, suppliers, and communities. They have an obligation to use their position of leadership to help limit the terrible human cost of disasters by doing everything they can to prepare, respond, and recover.

Lives have been disrupted this hurricane season, and in the worst cases, lives have been lost. While our systems have made advances to reduce the human cost, we can’t rest until we reach zero impact in terms of the loss of human life, strengthen our communities to better withstand the devastating effects of these events, and shore up our supply chains to keep our business up and running and our economy healthy.